MIT Sloan Executive Education

innovation@work™ Blog

Category Archives: Faculty Insights

Mapping collective intelligence to design winning organizations

It’s likely you’ve heard of collective intelligence, the term used broadly to refer to groups of individuals doing things collectively that seem intelligent. The most well-known examples of collective intelligence in action are Google and Wikipedia—large, loosely organized groups of people working together in a rapid transfer information stream.

What many organizations don’t know—but could benefit from—is the use of mapping collective intelligence to dissect and better understand their people, processes, and sources of inefficiency and, in some cases, to create a structure to improve business innovation.

Continue reading

Three ways to profit from business complexity

Business complexity is usually seen as an obstacle to increased profit margins. A publication of The Global Simplicity Index revealed that complexity is costing 200 of the biggest companies in the world 10.2% of their annual profits—which, collectively, totals over $237 billion. But other recent studies show there is a profitable flipside to business complexity—a relatively unexplored area of opportunity hiding in plain site. For some companies, managing business complexity can be a unique opportunity to grow their market share.

Not All Complexity in Business is Value Destroying

According to Martin Mocker, Research Scientist at MIT’s Sloan Center for Information Systems Research (CISR), not all complexity in business is value destroying. In fact, in some instances business complexity can be value-adding, offering companies an opportunity to grow their market share. The key, says Mocker, is to focus on complexity that delivers “variety seeking, one-stop-shopping, customization, or seamless integration.” Finding balance, “keeping the complexity of their processes and systems—both internal and customer-facing—under control,” is the way to manage business complexity toward a profitable advantage.

Continue reading

Gender stereotypes in negotiation—does Sheryl Sandberg have it right?

How do you negotiate when you need to make a positive impression? The answer may depend on your gender.

lean-in-book-coverIn Sheryl Sandberg’s much discussed Lean In, the author describes research findings that women perceived as hard-charging types are liked less. She advises women to smile profusely during a negotiation, use the word “we” instead of “I,” and express appreciation to your bosses. Of course, Sandberg is aware of the contradictions implicit in these instructions, given the tenet of the book itself and adds, “No wonder women don’t negotiate.”

Her point is not lost on negotiation theorists who understand that for both genders there exists a tension between claiming value for oneself and being likeable in a conversation or negotiation. Women are assumed to be warm and relational, which might represent a barrier to advocating for themselves, whereas men are assumed to be competitive and thus less empathic in a conflict.

In “Making a Positive Impression in Negotiation: Gender Difference in Response to Impression Motivation” (Negotiation and Conflict Management Research), MIT Sloan Professor Jared Curhan and Jennifer R. Overbeck, of the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business, examined the ways in which impression motivation—the attempt to regulate other people’s impressions of oneself—affects a negotiator’s ability to claim value and to actually make a positive impression on his or her counterparts.

Continue reading