Michael Schrage

Research Fellow, MIT Center for Digital Business
Visiting Fellow, Imperial College Department of Innovation and Entrepreneurship


Michael Schrage Michael Schrage examines the various roles of models, prototypes, and simulations as collaborative media for innovation risk management. He has served as an advisor on innovation issues and investments to major firms, including Mars, Procter & Gamble, Google, Intel, BT, Siemens, NASDAQ, IBM, and Alcoa.

In addition, Schrage has advised segments of the national security community on cyberconflict and cybersecurity issues. He has presented workshops on design experimentation and innovation risk for businesses, organizations, and executive education programs worldwide. Along with running summer workshops on future technologies for the Pentagon's Office of Net Assessment, he has served on the technical advisory committee of MIT's Lincoln Laboratory. In collaboration with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), Schrage helped launch a series of workshops sponsored by the Department of Defense on federal complex systems procurement. In 2007, he served as a judge for the Industrial Designers Society of America's global International Design Excellence Awards.

Schrage authored the lead chapter on governance in complex systems acquisition in Organizing for a Complex World (CSIS 2009). He has been a contributor to such prestigious publications as the Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, the Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, strategy+business, IEEE Software, and the Design Management Journal. In his best-selling book, Serious Play (Harvard Business School Press, 2000), Schrage explores the culture, economics, and future of prototyping. His next book, Getting Beyond Ideas (Wiley), is forthcoming in 2010.

Faculty Media

  • Love Your Ex-Employees and They’ll Love You Back

    Ironically, one of the most powerful and persuasive ways to inspire commitment inside the enterprise is maintaining healthy relationships with high-achievers who’ve left the organization.

  • Get More Innovative by Rethinking the Way You Think

    Innovating how we innovate. Improving how we improve. Analyzing how we analyze. Gimmicky workplace wordplay? Absolutely! But effective prods and provocations for inspiring organizational...

  • The Scientific Reason Your Employees Value Opinions Over Facts

    You could have the best data around. Here's why your people will probably ignore it.

  • Watch Out: Don't Go Down the Wrong Big Data Path

    Michael Schrage, a research fellow at MIT Sloan School's Center for Digital Business, wrote an article in the September 2014 edition of the Harvard Business Review that discussed the value of...

  • When Authenticity Does More Harm than Good

    There’s a reason why most people smile at the late George Burns’ great bon mot that, “The key to success in acting is sincerity; because if you can fake that, you’ve got it made.”

  • Whether You’re Qualified Depends on How You’re Quantified

    Brainteasers need not apply when it comes to hiring. Real-world research affirms that interview questions like How many golf balls could you fit into a school bus? “don’t predict anything” and “are...

  • VW’s Problem Is Bad Management, Not Rogue Engineers

    When bad management basically subsidizes bad actors, that’s bad news.

  • Is VW’s Fraud the End of Large-Scale Corporate Deception?

    Volkswagen’s brazen and bizarre “Diesel-gate” deception beggars belief. This sustained and sophisticated software scam suggests truly pathological levels of managerial desperation and contempt:...

  • Is Now the Time to Hang Up on Office Voicemails?

    With Coca-Cola and JP Morgan both scrapping voicemail systems for office landlines, Insights takes a look at whether this is the end of the line for the system, and what this means for the workplace.

  • Tech’s Holy Grail: IT Can’t Afford to Choose Poorly

    When we’re surrounded by “next big things,” how does IT decide what to choose and what to do with that choice?


Contact Information

Email: schrage@mit.edu
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