The MIT Sloan Advanced Management Program—a transformational experience

It comes as no surprise that like many post graduate programs, the MIT Sloan Advanced Management Program (AMP) is an intensive learning experience geared toward the seasoned professional who needs to balance accelerated learning options with the demands of a full-time career.

What is surprising about AMP is that, in addition to its challenging learning experience, the program has a distinctive feature that differentiates it from similar programs, making it—in a word—transformational. While providing participants with real-time solutions to complex business problems, AMP also gives participants access to MIT’s “innovation ecosystem.” This unique component involves interaction with executive panels, tours of Cambridge-area laboratories, and visits to well-known companies like Ambri and Akamai.

With only 25 participants in each class, the Advanced Management Program provides an intimate learning environment as well as access to the School’s renowned faculty and research. Because of the small class size, attendees experience one-on-one leadership coaching and individualized, 360-degree feedback assessments from some of the most respected scholars in the world. In addition, AMP fosters connections with executives from around the world and provides the chance to build life-long, global networks with peers who share similar professional experiences.

According to Dr. Peter Hirst, Executive Director of MIT Sloan Executive Education, the guiding purpose of AMP is to “deepen the ability of executives so they can make significant and systemic changes in their companies and the world. This transformational program is designed to help seasoned executives succeed in a world that is increasingly more unpredictable, competitive, and complex.”

In addition to offering executives new approaches to critical leadership and change management skills, AMP gives participants an opportunity to explore faculty research in areas like strategic and systemic thinking, leadership, and innovation. Custom components are an integral part of the program and include topics on high-level negotiation, crisis management, and the health and wellness of the busy executive. Program participants also will take several open enrollment courses, including Understanding Global Markets: Macroeconomics for Executives; Building Game-Changing Organizations: Aligning Purpose, Performance, and People; and Negotiation for Executives.

Another unique component of AMP is the alumni gathering at its conclusion, where a theme-based agenda reconnects past participants so they can share their lessons learned.

“The program brought a diverse group of senior executives from all over the world together during an intense five-week course. The open environment, the exchange and application within the MIT network made the experience very valuable and created friendships that will last a lifetime,” said an AMP participant who is a finance executive working in biotechnology.

AMP faculty include:


  • Deborah Ancona, Seley Distinguished Professor of Management, Professor of Organization Studies, and Faculty Director of the MIT Leadership Center

  • Pierre Azoulay, Sloan Distinguished Associate Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

  • Roberto Fernandez, William F. Pounds, Professor in Management and Professor of Organization Studies
  • Nelson Repenning, Professor of System Dynamics and Program Co-Director of Implementing Improvement Strategies: Practical Tools and Methods


  • Steve Spear, Senior Lecturer at MIT Sloan and author of The High Velocity Edge: How Market Leaders Leverage Operational Excellence to Beat the Competition
  • Ezra Zuckerman, Nanyang Technological University Professor; Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management; and Chair of the MIT Sloan PhD Program


The next session of AMP will be held on the Cambridge, MA campus from May 27 to June 27, 2014. Participants must enroll for the session by March 31, 2014.

This entry was posted in About Exec Ed on Sat Jan 18, 2014 by MIT Sloan Executive Education

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