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Catherine Tucker named one of “The 40 Most Outstanding B-School Profs Under 40 In The World” by Poets&Quants

photo (1)Younger than their tenured colleagues, only a few years older than their students, and still having to prove themselves both as professors and leaders in their field, young professors face added stress. However, a select few thrive in this pressure cooker, outperforming senior teaching staff, winning the admiration of their students, and producing standout scholarship.

Poets&Quants’  “Top 40 Under 40″ recognizes these rising stars—young professors who represent elite schools from around the world. These uncommon professors have excelled in research while overcoming the green-professor label in the classroom. MIT Sloan Executive Education is proud to announce that our own Catherine Tucker is among their list of the world’s best b-school professors under the age of 40. The 36-year old MIT Sloan Associate Professor of Marketing and Mark Hyman Jr. Career Development Professor is recognized for her ability to excel in research, win the admiration of her students, and produce outstanding scholarly work. Read her profile on Poets&Quants here.

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Post PRISM: The relationship between innovation and privacy

In the aftermath of whistleblower Edward Snowden and the ongoing press coverage of the National Security Association’s (NSA) clandestine surveillance program, the political ramifications of all of the above remain uncertain. What is apparent, however, is the immediate, collective increase in awareness of just how much data we “give away” every day online, and how that data is used by organizations—government and business alike—for their benefit.

Many business leaders and marketers are wondering how a resurgence of consumers attempting to regain their privacy will affect innovation in the global economy. While there is a clear relationship—and now a growing tension—between innovations that rely on consumer data and the protection of consumer privacy, there may be compromises to consider that are amenable to both the innovator and the consumer.

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Three ways to use privacy policies to build stronger customer relationships

In the quest for progress, companies continue to explore how technology can interpret consumer data to improve our quality of life. For example, Google continues to push boundaries with its latest invention, Google Glass, designed to display information in a smartphone-like hands-free format and interact with the Internet via natural language voice commands (see video below).

But with this new breakthrough comes increased concerns. Recently, eight members of the House Privacy Caucus sent a letter to Google co-founder and CEO Larry Page concerning the privacy aspects of Google Glass—and for good reason. The new Google Glass technology exposes anyone in the path of a Google Glass wearer to unauthorized photography and monitoring. Unfortunately, the lines are becoming increasingly blurred between using big data to improve our lives and intruding upon our privacy.

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