Category: Supply Chain Strategy

The need for supply chain flexibility

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 4 months and 29 days ago

According to David Simchi-Levi, Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT Sloan, “a growing number of U.S. executives are moving some production operations back from overseas.” While there are a great number of factors driving that trend, one is the need for supply chain flexibility. Today’s global supply chain presents a significant amount of risk, mostly due to the combination of geographically diverse supply chains and Just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing that results in low inventory levels. 

Continue reading

How to manage effectively in the face of risk

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 9 months and 6 days ago

With globalization comes increased risk and uncertainty in nations, environments, communities, and businesses. As growing complexity makes it more difficult to determine the source of risk in these complex systems, it also reveals the interdependent nature of risk within a greater ecosystem. New studies show the best way to manage an organization in the face of risk is to build resiliency—the ability to withstand, recover from, and maintain function through a crisis.  But in order to manage risk effectively, resiliency must be built into the entire interrelated system of an organization.

Continue reading

Mapping risk with the beer game

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 10 months and 20 days ago

As MIT Sloan Professor John Sterman told MIT Technology Review, “there’s no actual beer in the Beer Game.” Instead, it’s an exercise for MIT Sloan students that simulates the supply chain of the beer industry. The roles include retailer, wholesaler, distributor, and brewer; the goal is to make operating costs as low as possible. The Beer Game demonstrates the fluctuations of inventories and backlogs and how they impact the bottom line.

Continue reading

Does the return of manufacturing to the U.S. mean more jobs?

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 11 months and 5 days ago

The return of manufacturing to the U.S., also referred to as the “repatriation” or “re-shoring” by American and non-American companies alike, on the surface sounds like good news for employment. However, this is not necessarily the case. Although manufacturing output over the last 60 years has grown roughly by 3.7% annually, employment has stayed mostly flat during this time. Why does this continue to be true, even as many companies have been moving manufacturing back to the U.S. since 2010?

Continue reading

Search innovation@work Blog

Subscribe to Blog by Email

Visit the Media Gallery to view videos and read articles and blog posts written by MIT Sloan Executive Education faculty and staff.

Interested in writing a guest post?