Category: Social Media & Management

Is your online persona projecting the right image?

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 5 months and 13 days ago

"In our digital age, it's no surprise that the use of video is increasing in all industries, whether it is in a business setting to encourage employees to take action, teaching videos to train employees, or videos to boost morale," says MIT Professor Edward Schiappa. "Videos are a powerful medium and if we want to encourage people about certain behaviors, it is more powerful to show and not just tell through a visual channel."


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The expression "a picture is worth a thousand words" may have started as an advertising slogan, but there is no question that visual images are just as powerful in today's digital age as they were in predigital society. In fact, in a society where people often meet for the first time via LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, or Instagram, visual elements are an important part of an online profile, professional or otherwise. The question to ask is, "Are you the master of the visual messages that you are sending personally, professionally, or on behalf of your organization?"

As a society, we innately make inferences based on images and often make snap judgements from those inferences. In turn, those judgements affect how we are perceived by the people we want to influence in our daily lives, whether they are friends, family, or potential employers. According to Edward Schiappa, MIT Professor and expert in the field of digital communications, there are three things to think about when it comes to visual persuasion in the digital age and identifying who you are online.

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Beware the negative review

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 1 year and 7 months and 22 days ago

Business owners and foodies alike are relatively well versed in the dynamics around Yelp and other crowd-sourced review sites. Recently, trust is a primary area of concern. Just this week, Jonah Bromwich stately plainly in his New York Times article, "Two Apps to Guide you to Good Food," that "I don’t trust Yelp reviewers." And it appears he may have good reason.

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recent study by MIT Sloan Professor Duncan Simester and Eric T. Anderson of Kellogg School of Management of Northwestern University, found that approximately 5% of product reviews on a large retailer's website were submitted by customers who had no record of purchasing the product. These insincere reviews were also significantly more negative than others. As a result of findings such as these, many businesses are now including language in their contracts to ban customers from (or even fine them for) writing negative reviews--a reaction that has created it's own ripple of controversy. Anti-disparagement clauses, however, are probably unenforceable and are now illegal in California and may soon become illegal in every state.

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Social media professionals need leadership skills

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 2 years and 2 months and 14 days ago

The “Twitterverse” is awash in corporate brands publishing inappropriate, insensitive and/or irrelevant tweets. As of this writing, the latest corporate Twitter embarrassment happened to DiGiorno Pizza, a U.S.-based frozen pizza brand owned by Nestlé. Someone on the DiGiorno social media team jumped on the hashtag #WhyIStayed—used in discussions about domestic abuse—responding most unfortunately: “You had pizza.” While the team quickly deleted the tweet and apologized, the error was very public—and, as with most Twitter gaffes, highlighted a recurring problem with Twitter: a corporate brand’s social media team ignoring context.

One common response to any social media gaffe is to assume the brand’s social media team is comprised of interns or millennials—those “digital native” workers who grew up with texting, tweeting, and posting to Facebook walls. In many cases, that assumption is correct. Those newer workers often lack the business experience and leadership skills necessary to maintain and promote an on-brand, relevant, and appropriate social presence. 

The answer? Education. Millennials should learn, adopt, and cultivate key leadership practices in an effort to become savvier business professionals. In the article, “In Praise of the Incomplete Leader,” MIT Sloan Professor Deborah Ancona presents the four leadership capabilities all organizations require: sensemaking, relating, visioning, and inventing. While all these skills are extremely valuable, the skill of sensemaking is the most relevant to those professionals working in social media.

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Will online reviews require proof of purchase?

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 2 years and 3 months and 4 days ago

The success of recommendation and review websites and applications such as Yelp and TripAdvisor are undeniable. As of the end of July 2014, Yelp had a cumulative 61 million reviews. These reviews are quite powerful: studies have found that 88% of consumers trust them. Surprisingly, the vast majority of reviews on Yelp receive four or five stars (out of five).

But mention Yelp to a chef or restaurateur, and their reaction is likely to be much less positive. One of the issues is that of “cyber-shilling,” where consumers are paid to write reviews—positive or negative. And there have long been rumors and anecdotes of Yelp forcing businesses to pay to suppress negative reviews; this accusation has come up again in a recent shareholder lawsuit against Yelp. The outrage amongst the hospitality community in particular is so strong that a group of French restaurateurs and hoteliers is petitioning France’s Minister of Commerce to effectively ban all defamatory reviews.

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Political Innovation: Embracing and understanding customer service

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 2 years and 7 months and 27 days ago

Politics is a pursuit inherently built on customer service but without enough attention paid to those who matter the most: voters. In politics, voters are the customers, and instead of asking for a refund or an exchange, they can vote the politician out of office.

So why isn’t voter relations one of the top priorities of a campaign? Campaigns should hire a Chief Voter Relations Officer to manage voter relations and develop an organization that is always striving for perfection. In that way, the organization would be actively embracing customer service as an asset, not a chore.

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Post PRISM: The relationship between innovation and privacy

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 3 years ago

In the aftermath of whistleblower Edward Snowden and the ongoing press coverage of the National Security Association’s (NSA) clandestine surveillance program, the political ramifications of all of the above remain uncertain. What is apparent, however, is the immediate, collective increase in awareness of just how much data we “give away” every day online, and how that data is used by organizations—government and business alike—for their benefit. 

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