Category: Leadership

A personal story of accomplishment: Jackie Caniza

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 6 days ago

By Colleen Berger, Program Director, MIT Sloan Executive Education

Jackie Caniza at MIT Sloan

As a Program Director at MIT Sloan Executive Education, I have the good fortune of meeting many interesting, successful people from a variety of industries. I truly enjoy getting to know our participants and hearing their stories, and I would like to share a recent one with you.
Jackie Caniza is a Success Coach and HR Consultant at Business Hat, Inc. in the Philippines. After a 15-year career in corporate HR roles, she took a calculated risk and decided to start her own consulting business. Realizing she needed two separate educational tracks in order to succeed, she pursued her coaching certification while simultaneously evaluating executive education programs that would teach her the necessary business skills for starting and sustaining a business.

Jackie's father, a steadfast proponent of engineering and technology, had always aspired to spend time at MIT and suggested Jackie consider a program at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Given the considerable costs associated with starting a new business, Jackie was skeptical about being able to take on an additional commitment. But her father persisted, even offering to split the cost with her because he felt so strongly about the opportunity and the results it would produce.

In the fall of 2012, Jackie enrolled in four MIT Sloan Executive Education programs and earned an Executive Certificate in Management and Leadership. She was thrilled with her experience and the value of the education which could be immediately applied to her new business. End of story ... or so she thought.

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The Greater Boston Executive Program is back!

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 3 months and 12 days ago

After a brief hiatus, the Greater Boston Executive Program (GBEP) is back. Now in the hands of MIT Sloan Executive Education, this popular course was developed almost six decades ago by a partnership formed among MIT and various companies in the Greater Boston area. The program remains supported and guided by a Board of Governors made up of representatives from several Boston based firms, including the Federal Reserve Bank and Raytheon BBN Technologies.

The original goal was to create a management development program for mid-level managers who wanted to move into executive leadership roles. These forward-thinking companies recognized that fostering continuing education in management principles was essential for those who wanted to move up in their firms. Although many of the initial organizations were already participating in in-house management programs, they found there was something missing: a supplementary program that would expose participants to current thinking in management philosophy without taking them away from their respective workplaces for long periods. With the help of MIT's Howard W. Johnson, then President of MIT, the GBEP was established and held its first course in the spring of 1958. 

While the current program has its roots in the original one, it has been shortened, refreshed, and relaunched as part of the MIT Sloan Executive Education portfolio. Today, as before, the program offers the benefits of seminar discussions among participants--representatives from companies based in Greater Boston--while providing managers with current, research-based frameworks for understanding and improving leadership capabilities, the implementation of organization changes, and the management of human resources. 

According to MIT Sloan Professor John Van Maanen, who is Faculty Director of GBEP and one of three faculty members who teach in it, the program's frameworks and modules are complemented by the small class size and close student-faculty interaction, as well as the diversity of topics and participant backgrounds.

"I know of no other open enrollment executive course that fosters the amount of mutual learning over an extended period of time as the Greater Boston program," says Van Maanen. "The local character ensures relevance and uniqueness across a variety of companies and industries."

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Embodied leadership: Is neuroscience the next frontier in management?

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 3 months and 11 days ago

Contributed by Peter Hirst, Associate Dean, MIT Sloan Executive Education

Neuroscience

There has been much excitement in the media lately about how breakthroughs in neuroscience can be applied to improve our daily lives. From brain-boosting juices and snacks, to game apps designed to keep our brains agile, to marketing techniques promising more effective selling--neuroscience has captured public imagination.

While it's important to separate the hype from actual science, the fact that advances in brain-imaging technology have finally given researchers the tools to see with greater accuracy what's going on in our brains is full of promise. Long-held beliefs about how the brain works are now turning out to be if not exactly untrue, then at least up for debate. It's understandable that people are excited by the potential implications of these new possibilities. 

Applying Neuroscience Insights to Leadership Education

As Associate Dean of Executive Education at MIT Sloan School of Management, a big part of my job is to champion scientific knowledge as it applies to management and leadership education. So, needless to say, I was quite excited to learn what brain-based insights can teach business leaders.

My first glimpse of the tremendous potential that advances in neuroscience can bring to business leadership happened at the UNICON 2013 conference--a meeting of executive education providers from the world's leading business schools. It was there that I met Dr. Tara Swart, a neuroscientist and executive leadership coach who gave a compelling presentation on how brain science can be applied in management and leadership education.

Her presentation posed a number of thought-provoking questions. How can our understanding of the agility and diversity of thinking affect our leadership effectiveness? Is it actually possible to create a whole new mindset and to disrupt deeply embedded leadership patterns? Can we truly overcome what Harvard Graduate School of Education professors Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey call our "immunity to change"? Can leaders truly be transformed and, in turn, transform their organizations? I was so impressed by what I saw that I immediately started thinking of ways to bring her knowledge to MIT Sloan

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What flat organizations can learn from the Head of the Charles

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 7 months and 9 days ago

Head of the Charles Regatta

This past weekend thousands of athletes, spectators and volunteers lined the banks of the Charles River in Boston for the 51st Head of the Charles Regatta. It is the largest two-day regatta in the world and draws competitors from colleges, high schools, and clubs from nearly every state in the U.S. and from 28 countries throughout the world. "Regattas such as the Head of the Charles in Boston and the Head of the Schuylkill in Philadelphia are to the rowing world what the New York Marathon and the Boston Marathon are to running," said Susan Saint Sing in The Eight: A Season in the Tradition of Harvard Crew.

To the average spectator at the Head of the Charles, rowing is a graceful, elegant sport, and a fun fall Boston event. But just like any sport where the elite in the field are competing, rowing in the Head of the Charles takes thousands of hours of hard work, dedication, and commitment. And the interpersonal dynamics within a successful, competitive rowing team present some intriguing lessons for those managing companies with today’s preferred "flat" organizational structure—one with few hierarchical levels and looser boundaries. 

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Aspen Faculty Pioneer: MIT's Thomas Kochan earns lifetime achievement award

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 7 months and 18 days ago

Thomas Kochan, the George Maverick Bunker Professor of Work and Employment Research and Engineering Systems at MIT Sloan School of Management, and the Co-Director for the Institute for Work and Employment Research at MIT was recently named the "Lifetime Achievement" award winner of this year's prestigious Aspen Faculty Pioneer Awards from the Aspen Institute of Business & Society Program. The Faculty Pioneer Awards were created in 1999 to honor educators who "demonstrate leadership and risk-taking--and blaze a trail toward curriculum that deeply examines the relationships between capital markets, firms and the public good." 

According to the Aspen Institute Business & Society Program, the focus on this year's awards was to recognize and honor faculty who are teaching about inequality in their MBA classrooms. The awards honor faculty who are prompting students to think expansively about their role as managers as well as global citizens, now and over the long term.

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Complex risk management--as seen on TV

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 11 months and 14 days ago

FV Northwestern

Reality TV is largely a wasteland of odd, meaningless drivel, in which business leaders rarely have the time (nor should they make the time) to invest watching. But within the very broad category, there are some meaningful glimpses of how people solve complex business problems. The stands-out show in this category might be  Discovery Channel's Deadliest Catch, which some herald as the "original" reality TV show.

For those not familiar with the show, now in its eleventh TV season, it focuses on a handful of boats fishing for crab in the Bering Sea off the coast of Alaska. And while many fans watch the show for the drama of the cold, vicious waters and the inherent danger in the job, others can glean some secrets for managing complex business operations. More than just entertaining TV, Alaskan red king crab (just one species caught and sold by the boats on the show) was valued at more than $90 million in 2012.

The title Deadliest Catch reflects the stark reality of the commercial fishing industry: since 1992, when the Bureau of Labor Statistics started publishing fatality rates by occupation, fishing has consistently ranked as the most deadly occupation. In 2006, the bureau found commercial fishing has an almost 75% higher fatality rate than that for pilots, flight engineers, and loggers (the next most deadly occupations). The fatality and injury statistics for Alaskan crab fisherman are even higher than the average for the industry, due to the dangerous conditions out on the Bering Sea.

When one watches the show with a discerning eye, it's apparent that crab fishing is, in fact, a very complex business. Each captain must manage multiple aspects of risk against hard deadlines, in real time. 

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Leader-led learning: The great differentiator

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 1 year and 6 days ago

Contributed by MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Steve Spear. Spear teaches in Creating High Velocity Organizations and is author of The High Velocity Edge: How Market Leaders Leverage Operational Excellence to Beat the Competition.

Certain organizations "punch above their weight," generating far more value (that accrues to everybody, not just customers or just shareholders, etc.), faster, and more easily. This despite them having access to the same technical, financial, and human resources as all their counterparts--and thereby enjoying the same advantages and suffering the same constraints.1

This becomes a wickedly important differentiator: Either because of having to get more yield out of exactly the same resources available to everyone, or because of having to be on the cutting edge of bringing high value-add products and services to market ahead of rivals.

The difference? They know much better what to do and how to do it, so operate on a frontier of speed, timeliness, efficiency, effectiveness, safety, security, and so forth others barely perceive. As with all knowledge, the source of their profound knowledge is accelerated learning, and that accelerated learning is the consequence of garnering feedback out of experiences across the spectrum of operational, design, and developmental and using that to feed forward into the next cycle of experiences.

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Leadership lessons from a flock of geese

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 1 year and 1 month and 16 days ago

Contributed by Jeff Ton, as originally published on April 8th on the author's blog

No, this post is not about a 2015 version of the 80's band, Flock of Seagulls. Nor, is it really about a flock of geese (lovingly referred to as Sky Carp by my friend Lance). This post is really about the lessons I learned while attending Transforming Your Leadership Strategy conducted by MIT Sloan Executive Education. I often joke that I feel smarter just by stepping on campus here in Cambridge. But, it really is no joke, I really do gain new insights each and every time I attend one of the classes here.

flock of geese

I believe what makes these courses unique and extremely valuable are the students themselves. The diversity of the participants is incredible. The countries and therefore the cultures represented included Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Kingdom, Greece, Spain, Ghana, France, Nigeria, Canada, Denmark, Brazil, and, of course, the United States. The industries represented ranged from NGO's, government agencies, banking, retail, financial, Army, and education (and many others). To be able to gather with these 60 professionals and discuss leadership was indeed a privilege.

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