Category: Energy Innovation

What does the Trump administration mean for climate change efforts?

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 7 days ago

climate change policy

On November 4, 2016, the historic Paris Agreement on climate change policy (#OurAccord) became international law. "Humanity will look back on November 4, 2016, as the day that countries of the world shut the door on inevitable climate disaster," said UN climate chief Patricia Espinosa and Moroccan Foreign Minister Salaheddine Mezouar in a joint statement that day.

Four days later, on November 8, Donald Trump was elected President of the United States. And overnight, the set of policies required to fulfill the promises of the Paris Accord were under threat.

Here's what we know. President Trump has called human-caused climate change a hoax. He has vowed to dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency "in almost every form." Trump has attacked Obama's Clean Power Plan as "a war on coal." And, perhaps most significantly, he has promised to renege on the U.S. pledge under the Paris Agreement, which commits more than 190 countries to reduce their emissions of planet-warming carbon dioxide pollution.

And so now, we wait.

However, as recently reported by ClimateWire, "For every conservative who dreams about ripping up the Paris Agreement, there's a company executive who wants to stay in." Shortly after the election, hundreds of U.S. businesses urged Trump to uphold the Paris climate deal. More than 360 companies and investors--from DuPont, eBay, and Nike to Unilever, Levi Strauss & Co., and Hilton--made their plea in an open letter to the incoming and outgoing administrations and members of Congress. (The signatories have since grown to over 700.)

And many companies are walking the walk. In a recent press release, Google announced it will reach 100% renewable energy and carbon neutrality in 2017. Iron Mountain signed a 15-year wind power purchase agreement that will supply 30% of its North American electricity needs with renewable energy. And here in Boston, MIT, Boston Medical Center, and Post Office Square Redevelopment Corporation have formed an alliance to buy electricity from a large new solar power installation, adding carbon-free energy to the grid and demonstrating a partnership model for other organizations in climate-change mitigation efforts.

Continue reading

Tackling Climate Change—Collectively

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 2 years and 2 months and 3 days ago

Climate change is an enormous issue that affects us all. Unfortunately—according to MIT Sloan Professor Tom Malone and his colleagues at the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence—national legislative initiatives, while significant, haven’t done enough. However, now through a crowdsourcing platform called the Climate CoLab, people throughout the world can collaborate with experts and contribute ideas that might alleviate the climate change problem. 

The old adage, two heads are better than one, has never been more applicable than at the Climate CoLab, a virtual think tank based at the Center. Except instead of two heads, we’re talking about 33,000. The Climate CoLab is a platform that gives anyone from anywhere the opportunity to collaborate with experts to create and develop possible solutions that address climate change. By its very nature the Climate CoLab community is diverse—comprised of a mix of concerned citizens, business people, and investors, as well as scientists and policy makers. Talk about collaboration.

 “Anyone is allowed to contribute. No matter who a person is or where they come from, they can contribute ideas and have them reviewed by an international community of thousands of people—including world-renowned experts from organizations like NASA, the World Bank, and the Union of Concerned Scientists, and leading universities like MIT, Stanford, and Columbia,” says Malone, who is Director of the Center and principal investigator for the Climate CoLab. 

Continue reading

Are consumers or lawmakers better at regulating energy efficiency standards?

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 3 years and 5 months and 2 days ago

A recent energy goal set by President Obama has MIT Sloan Professor Christopher Knittel and some colleagues questioning how best to track and control the public’s use of energy efficiency programs to make that goal a reality. The President’s goal aims to cut in half the energy wasted by our homes and businesses over the next 20 years. However, Knittel, who is the William Barton Rogers Professor of Energy Economics at MIT Sloan and Co-Director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR) at MIT, says before we buy into more stringent energy efficiency goals, we need to analyze the current situation more rigorously.

Continue reading

Search innovation@work Blog

Subscribe to Blog by Email

Cutting-edge research and business insights presented by MIT Sloan faculty.

Interested in writing a guest post?