Stress: It's a mind-body connection that affects us all

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 9 hours ago

No matter what we do in life, we all deal with some level of stress. As an executive leadership coach, medical doctor, neuroscientist, frequent keynote speaker and MIT Sloan Senior lecturer, Tara Swart certainly must know about stress.

Yet Swart, CEO of The Unlimited Mind, understands the connection between brain and body better than most—as well as how stress can affect both and manifest itself in different ways. For example, Swart says stress is "essentially a brain and body chemistry problem" that can affect a variety of different things, such as our ability to make decisions, concentration levels, how we express emotions, and the well being of our physical selves. Common symptoms of stress that manifest physically include back pain, headaches, clenched jaws, or nail biting.

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MIT Sloan Professor Catherine Tucker Receives Top Marketing Award

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 5 days ago

In recognition of her accomplishments as an emerging female marketing scholar and mentor, MIT Sloan Professor Catherine Tucker recently received the 2015 Erin Anderson Award, presented each year by the American Marketing Association Foundation (AMAF). 

The award recognizes the life of Erin Anderson--a widely respected mentor and marketing scholar from INSEAD whose research made significant contributions to marketing. It was presented in February at the AMA (American Marketing Association) Winter Marketing Educators' Conference in San Antonio, Texas.

As an Associate Professor of Management Science and the Mark Hyman Jr. Career Development Professor at MIT Sloan, Tucker has expertise in online advertising, digital health, social media, and electronic privacy. Tucker says she "is interested in how technology allows firms to use digital data to improve their operations and marketing and in the challenges this poses for regulations designed to promote innovation."

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High tech's shifting glass ceiling

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 7 days ago

The current lawsuit in Silicon Valley by Ellen Pao against the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins is drawing more attention to hot button issues in high tech, namely the very real and varied gender gap that continues to plague the industry.

According to the Forbes article, "Women in tech are losing, from top to bottom," only 9% of all CIOs are women. Why is the technology career path a tough road for women, and why do their numbers dwindle as they climb up the ranks? A recent study from MIT shows that women already inside the technology industry are experiencing what is known as a shifting glass ceiling, and it starts with the recruitment process.

Internal promotion vs external recruitment

In his paper, "Gender Sorting and the Glass Ceiling in High Tech," Roberto Fernandez, Professor of Organizational Studies at MIT Sloan, challenges the popular assumption that the prominent glass ceiling in the high tech industry is the result of disparities in the internal promotion processes. Instead, Fernandez claims that glass ceilings can also be the result of external recruitment.

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Prepare for your CIMA certification at MIT Sloan

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 13 days ago

MIT Sloan Executive Education recently partnered with the Investment Management Consultants Association® (IMCA®) to offer an online program for finance professionals interested in pursing the prestigious Certified Investment Management Analyst® (CIMA) certification. This new and innovative program with IMCA will help CIMA candidates meet their requirements and prepare for their examination.

Investment Management Theory and Practice is offered entirely online over a 60-day period preceding a CIMA certification exam. Designed with busy schedules in mind, participants may study at any time they choose during the 60-day period

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Corp. EDU: The role of corporate universities in addressing the talent gap

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 20 days ago

By Dr. Peter Hirst, Executive Director of MIT Sloan Executive Education

Not long ago, I wrote about the "talent gap," which was widely discussed at the Internet of Things World Forum in Chicago last October. The problem is real for many employers, particularly those in industries that rely on innovation driven by science, technology, engineering, infrastructure services, etc. In response, companies must be increasingly systematic and purposeful about organizational learning and addressing their talent development needs. More and more are doing so with little or no help from us in academia, relying on internal resources and the commercial education sector instead.

With respect to internal provision of corporate education, UNICON, the trade association of university-based executive education providers, released two studies recently on the complex relationships that exist between business schools and the growing phenomenon of "corporate universities." The studies--"Same Solar System, Different Orbits: Opportunities and Challenges in Executive Education and Corporate University Partnerships" and "Minding Their Business By Flexing Our Minds: A Guide To Corporate University Partnerships"--offer interesting comparisons between the two business education models. While these reports were written primarily for an audience of academic executive education providers, they are worth a read for anyone who is interested in how the business education landscape is changing.  

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A career move strengthened by MIT Sloan courses

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 26 days ago

I never planned on a career in education. In fact, I left the film industry and came to Ball State University primarily for family reasons. Neither my boss nor I thought I’d stay long. However, what I found was a forward-thinking institution in a sector full of challenges and opportunities. I found my passion at the intersection of innovation, learning, and technology. Now with the benefit of hindsight, it's easy to explain how everything came together over the past five years.

I earned my Executive Certificate in Strategy and Innovation from MIT Sloan School of Management at just the right time. In 2009, I was tasked with forming a new administrative unit within IT at Ball State named "Emerging Technologies and Media Development." With this unit, I was able to immediately implement many of the lessons learned in my MIT courses at my daily job. From administrative structure to office layout, my goal was to follow best practices.

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Accenture and MIT: Preparing the next generation of technology leaders

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 1 month and 5 days ago

Accenture, the global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company, is working in collaboration with MIT Sloan Executive Education to develop the Accenture Technology Executive Development Program, which kicked off earlier this month. This exciting custom program is designed to encourage thinking radically and differently about technology in order to bring innovative and disruptive solutions to clients.

The custom tailored Accenture Technology Executive Development Program will give select Accenture Technology professionals a unique opportunity to learn from MIT Sloan faculty, Accenture leadership, and their peers. It focuses on the growing, changing role of technology within organizations and how leaders can harness technology to increase an organization's agility as well as prepare for future demands.

"Technology is changing at an unprecedented rate and innovation is more important than ever," says Paul Daugherty, Chief Technology Officer at Accenture. "This program will help our future leaders stay on top of the changes and understand how new innovations can help our clients grow and stay competitive."

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When snow days are no longer fun

Posted by MIT Sloan Executive Education - 1 month and 13 days ago

Some of you may look back fondly on the "snow days" of your youth, recalling the excitement and anticipation of hearing the announcement that meant a day to stay home and play. For those of us who currently reside in Greater Boston, however, snow days have lost their allure.

Since January 15, 2015, the Boston area has had an unusual number of snow storms resulting in an unprecedented amount of snow. We've had our snowiest month since record-keeping started in 1872, and (so far) the area is marking its third snowiest winter on record, with 89.2 inches. To put that in perspective, Boston has seen more snow in three weeks than Chicago has seen in an entire winter.

What's worse, the resulting snow days are wreaking havoc on businesses in the area. According to the Boston Globe, the snow has "cost Massachusetts companies more than $1 billion in lost sales and productivity." For large businesses, the decision to remain open or to close may be easy. Some businesses, like chain restaurants and retail stores, may have the analytics to back them up--data to understand how much revenue they’d need to earn to offset the cost of doing business that day. But smaller businesses--particularly restaurants and boutique stores--struggle with that decision. 

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